COMMENTARY
India and Pakistan: The Promise of Peace
Oxford, 28 May 2014
Since his election as prime minister for the third time last year, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been quite clear about resuming peace process with India by “picking up the thread” from Lahore Declaration—the historic agreement he had concluded with former Indian Prime Minister and BJP leader Atal Behari Vajpayee in February 1999. And a major reason why this promising development could not happen was because his Indian counterpart Prime Minister Manmohan Singh lacked the political capital to move boldly in resolving major differences over terrorism and lingering disputes like Kashmir. This limitation is now over: For, beyond the exchange of pleasantries and rhetorical pronouncements of peace, the debut meeting between Sharif and Modi on May 27 has indeed had tangible outcomes. To start with, Sharif and Modi were able to build mutual rapport. Modi shared his happiness on twitter about the care Pakistani leader had for his mot
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